Social Activism In Fashion

How The Fashion Industry Is Being Used A Means For Activism Today

It may not always be as apparent, but fashion has always been influenced by the mood in society. Clothes are used for self-expression, and when this medium is put to use in order to express a collective message, it becomes fashion activism. This is not a new concept and has been adapted several times in the past. For example, French women used hats and accessories to protest against Nazi occupation and celebrate French culture during the World War II. 

Over the last few years, the visual impact fashion has on the public has multiplied. It is a platform that can be used to influence the masses, or at the very least, kick off a dialogue. Many fashion designers understand this power of fashion and have consistently used their shows to provoke their audience to think about pressing matters. Issues such as body image, politics, animal rights, racism, inequality, and inclusivity have been carefully incorporated by brands and their creative directors into their collections. 

On the flip-side, we also see the general public using fashion as a medium to show support for a cause. Many are starting to believe that clothes can serve much more than adding aesthetic value. Today information is more fluid and malleable than ever before. Its accessibility has helped big movements take shape. It has become equally easy for the people to opine to a prospective large audience. An issue that is sensitive to a large sum takes only a few moments to go viral. 

Clothes are continuing to serve as a channel to bring about dialogue and evoke change, and they represent the spirit and culture of the society. This report touches upon today's prominent issues, seen through the lens of fashion.

Content

  1. Introduction
  2. Activism about Politics
  3. Activism about Racism
  4. Activism about Feminism
  5. Activism about LGBTQ Community
  6. Activism about Environmental Causes
  7. Other Causes
  8. Prominent Faces Known for Fashion Activism
 
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